The greatest gift is the
gift of the teachings
 
Dharma Talks given at Insight Meditation South Bay - Silicon Valley
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2020-01-21 Realizing Freedom 46:17
  Toni Bernhard
In the Third Noble Truth the Buddha explained it is possible to end suffering and our inclination for making it worse.
In collection Buddha's Core Teachings: Finding True Happiness Through the Four Noble Truths

2020-01-07 Buddha's Core Teachings: Finding True Happiness Through the Four Noble Truths 2:46:38
No one wants to suffer, and yet stress is everywhere in our lives. After the Buddha awakened under the Bodhi Tree, the first thing he talked about was how to find true happiness. He described four wise ways you can work with your mind in the midst of ordinary and meditative experiences, popularly known as the Four Noble Truths. You can (1) comprehend your suffering; (2) abandon its causes; (3) realize that it is possible to end suffering; and (4) follow the path that leads to its end. Practicing this path, you will become free—not by avoiding what is unwanted, but by developing a wise relationship to your mind and all the myriad conditions by which it manufactures stress.

2020-01-07 Dukkha - Understanding How Things Are 36:53
  Lisa Dale Miller
The Buddha explained in the First Noble Truth how the inherent unsatisfactoriness of human existence gives rise to all forms of human suffering. True understanding of this teaching liberates habitual tendencies to harm oneself, others and our world.
In collection Buddha's Core Teachings: Finding True Happiness Through the Four Noble Truths

2019-10-01 Right View Comes First 47:57
  Thanissaro Bhikkhu
Thanissaro Bhikkhu reviews the Four Noble Truths as the categorical teaching of the Buddha - true and always beneficial. He describes the duties that enable us to fully understand and comprehend them and how the three characteristics - Dukkha, Annica, Anatta - are used in support of these duties and this understanding.

2019-09-10 Listening as a Spiritual Practice 52:55
  Daniel Bowling
Daniel Bowling describes the many ways that we filter what we hear, which prevents us from really listening. By recognizing when we are listening through our sense of self and our conditioned thoughts and reactions, we can become aware of, and short-circuit, the patterns that disconnect us from life. This enables us to follow the Buddha's instructions to Bahiya -"there will be only the seen in reference to the seen, only the heard in reference to the heard, only the sensed in reference to the sensed, only the cognized in reference to the cognized."

2019-09-03 The Joy that leads to Enlightenment 37:35
  Ayya Santussika
Ayya Santussika describes the Six Recollections taught by the Buddha and how they may benefit our meditation and practice.

2019-08-13 Every Day is a Gift 34:29
  Misha Merrill
Misha describes the alternatives to dealing with hardship when it inevitably comes. Ignoring, despairing or delusionary optimism are unskillful; instead she discusses a kind of wise hope based on deep investigation of the heart.
In collection Meditation in Hard Times

2019-08-06 Dukkha as a Chronic Illness, with Tony Bernhard 48:26
  Tony Bernhard
Tony covers the four noble truths and the 8-fold path with many modern metaphors. He suggests the dharma is like an inoculation against the suffering we tend to add on top of the inevitable pain that comes with living a human life. He describes how a vedana meter can be a useful means of bringing attention to the range of feeling tones evoked by experiences and thereby sharpening insight into the way things are.
Saturday Talks
In collection Meditation in Hard Times

2019-07-23 Illness as a Doorway to Freedom 43:24
  Nikki Mirghafori
Nikki Mirghafori shows us that illness and hardship are not just to be endured, they can actually be our teachers on the path.
Saturday Talks
In collection Meditation in Hard Times

2019-07-16 Taking the Problem out of Pain 47:45
  Shaila Catherine
In this talk, Shaila Catherine encourages practitioners to view illness and pain as opportunities to practice equanimity, patience, and mindfulness of the body. When we are sick or in pain, we can still practice being attentive to present conditions, and reflect that all beings are all also subject to illness and death. Illness is not wrong; it is inevitable. The more we resist this fact, the more mental suffering we add to our physical difficulties. When we learn to be present with both pleasant and unpleasant feelings, we will know an experience of profound peace.
In collection Meditation in Hard Times

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