The greatest gift is the
gift of the teachings
 
Dharma Talks given at Insight Meditation South Bay - Silicon Valley
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2008-03-11 Death and Dying: Returning to the Source 48:26
  Misha Merrill
Embracing Aging, Sickness and Death as Heavenly Messengers

2008-03-11 Politics & the Dharma 57:40
  Tony Bernhard

2008-02-26 Re-imagining Aging: An Exploration of Possibility 47:58
  Sandi Peters
Embracing Aging, Sickness and Death as Heavenly Messengers

2008-02-19 Heavenly Messengers—Aging, Illness, and Death 49:16
  Shaila Catherine
We are all vulnerable to aging, illness, and death. Everything born will eventually die. How can we contemplate death in a way that brings us to realize the deathless liberation of mind? How can we go beyond birth and death by facing the reality of our existence? Reflecting on death is one traditional way to contemplate the nature of the body. These meditations include contemplating the decaying corpse, body contemplations, noticing that our friends and loved ones perish. We are all friends who share birth, old age, sickness, and death.
Tuesday Talks

2007-11-27 Faith & Interrelatedness : Practice in Action 43:50
  Ajahn Metta

2007-11-13 Awakening the Heart: The role of trust and devotion in meditation practice 48:30
  Thanissara

2007-10-16 The Hindrances: Doubt 41:30
  Shaila Catherine
Doubt can be an obstacle to meditation or a form of healthy inquiry. It is helpful to ask questions, to ponder, and be willing to doubt our beliefs and opinions. Ask yourself: are my views true? We hold many unexamined beliefs—beliefs about self, about how things should be, about what other people should do. The Kalama Sutta encourages us to question what we think, and to not adopt beliefs based on hearsay or mere tradition. We can use our minds to critically inquire into how things actually are. Doubt as an obstacle, on the other hand, is a painful state that leads to confusion, fear, indecision, and uncertainty. It manifests as obsessive thinking, planning, and anxiety. The Discourse to Malunkyaputta (Middle Length Discourses, M. 63) proposes that if we indulge in speculative thinking we might miss the opportunity to free ourselves from suffering. Specific suggestions are offered for working skillfully with the hindrance of doubt.
Tuesday Talks

2007-10-09 Hindrances, Restlesness 44:05
  Andrea Fella
The hindrance of restlessness and remorse is a fundamental hindrance out of which the other hindrances can arise. The importance of becoming familiar with restlessness, to see or understand its nature, is discussed. Through having a clear understanding of how it arises in the mind and in the body one can work with its various manifestations in practice.

2007-10-04 Big Mind Guided Meditation 45:42
  Shaila Catherine
Guided meditation, meditation instructions
In collection Featured Guided Meditations

2007-08-21 Enlightenment and Mindful Awareness 62:50
  Lama Surya Das
Unlike the three Western monotheistic religions, Buddhism is not a religion of the book. Rather, Buddhism is based on the Buddha’s enlightened experience. More specifically, among other things, the Buddha was an early scientist. He said that if you reproduce his experiment by cultivating the Eightfold Path, your can replicate the same enlightenment result in yourself. There is no need for any beliefs, cosmology, dogma or creed. Indeed, all sentient beings are endowed by the luminous Buddha nature. The Buddha merely serves as a mirror for us to see our own enlightened nature. However, this means that we need to have the wisdom to see our true nature as it really is. This wisdom is described as the “right view” in the first step of the Eightfold Path. The problem is how can we see things as they really are when our attention is so scattered and our view is so obscured by poisons such as greed, hatred, delusion, pride and jealousy? The answer is through mindful awareness. Indeed, mindful awareness is something that we can learn even the first time we meditate. Eventually, we can reach a state of effortless awareness. This clear seeing allows our mindfulness to create some space between the stimulus and our response. Instead of knee-jerk, blind response, our mind has more time to choose a more skillful, intelligent response, thus, leading to more freedom and proactivity.

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