The greatest gift is the
gift of the teachings
 
Dharma Teachers of Insight Meditation South Bay - Silicon Valley
Teachers are listed alphabetically by first name, with monks and nuns given priority. You may also enter any part of a name in the text box and click "Find Teacher by Name."

‹‹ previous      1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Ajahn Brahmavamso

Ajahn Metta
Ajahn Metta was born 1953 in Germany. She became an Anagārikā in ‘93 at Amaravati and took higher ordination as a Sīladhāra in ‘96. During her monastic life she has been involved in many areas of the community. She is one of the group of senior nuns leading the Sīladhārā community. For the past few years she has been teaching meditation workshops and retreats. Prior to monastic life she worked as a secretary and office assistant. She is a mother of a grown-up son and was living a family life before entering the monastic path. She has been practising meditation since ‘84 and has experience of living in other spiritual communities in Europe and Thailand (Wat Suan Mokkh).

Ayya Anandabodhi
Ayya Anandabodhi is co-founder of Aloka Vihara, a training monastery for women near Placerville, CA, where she currently resides. She has practiced meditation since 1989, and lived as part of the Ajahn Chah lineage at Amaravati and Chithurst monasteries for 18 years. In 2009 she moved to the US and took full bhikkhuni ordination in 2011.

Ayya Santacitta
After being inspired by the presence and teachings of Ajahn Buddhadasa, i ordained 1993 at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery, UK. i co-founded and reside at Aloka Vihara Forest Monastery in the Sierra Foothills of California and have a particular interest in learning from nature and bringing faith traditions to the climate movement.

Ayya Santussika
Ayya Santussika, in residence at Karuna Buddhist Vihara (Compassion Monastery), spent five years as an anagarika (eight-precept nun), then ordained as a samaneri (ten-precept nun) in 2010 and as a bhikkhuni (311 rules) in 2012 at Dharma Vijaya Buddhist Vihara in Los Angeles.

Ayya Sobhana
Ayya Sobhana has meditated and trained with Bhante Henepola Gunaratana since 1989. Her primary practice is the Eightfold Noble Path, that is, integration of meditation with ethical living and compassionate relationships for the sake of liberation. She ordained in 2003 and obtained full Bhikkhuni ordination at Dambulla, Sri Lanka, in 2006. Last year, Ayya Sobhana moved from the Bhavana Society in West Virginia to Aranya Bodhi Awakening Forest Hermitage, where she is the Prioress. Aranya Bodhi is a new community for monastic women located on the Sonoma Coast of California.

Ayya Tathaaloka

Bhikkhu Bodhi
Bhikkhu Bodhi is an American Buddhist monk originally from New York City. He lived as a monk in Sri Lanka for 24 years and now lives at Chuang Yen Monastery in upstate New York. Ven. Bodhi has many important publications to his credit, either as author, translator or editor, including The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha (Majjhima Nikaya, 1995) and The Connected Discourses of the Buddha (Samyutta Nikaya, 2000). A full translation of the Anguttara Nikaya is due out in 2011. In 2008 he founded Buddhist Global Relief, a Buddhist organization dedicated to providing relief from poverty and hunger among impoverished communities worldwide.

Sayadaw U Jagara
Born in Canada, Ven. U Jagara was introduced to Buddhist practice in the early 1970’s by Robert Hoover, and ordained as a monk under the Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw in Burma in 1979. He spent 15 years in Sri Lanka combining meditation with the study of Buddhist texts and periodically traveled to India where he practiced in intense retreats with S. N. Goenka. For several years he conducted retreats in India, America, Europe and Asia in the S.N. Goenka tradition. Since 1995 U Jagara has trained under the guidance of Pa Auk Sayadaw, the Burmese master renowned for his faithful adherence to the Visuddhimagga as both a practical guide to jhana and a detailed exposition of direct analytical approaches to vipassana. U Jagara assists Pa Auk Sayadaw in the teaching.

Thanissaro Bhikkhu
Dharma practice is medicine for the mind -- something particularly needed in a culture like ours that actively creates mental illness in training us to be busy producers and avid consumers. As individuals, we become healthier through our Dharma practice, which in turn helps bring sanity to our society at large.

‹‹ previous      1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Creative Commons License