The greatest gift is the
gift of the teachings
 
Lisa Dale Miller's Dharma Talks at Insight Meditation South Bay - Silicon Valley
Lisa Dale Miller
Lisa Dale Miller, LMFT, LPCC, SEP, is a private practice psychotherapist in Los Gatos, CA. She specializes in mindfulness psychotherapy and Somatic Experiencing therapy for the treatment of depression, anxiety, addiction, trauma, emotional dysregulation, chronic pain, and relationship stress. Lisa is an outpatient clinician for the Veterans Administration San Jose and a teacher of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention (MBRP) for addiction, Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for depression relapse prevention, and Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). Lisa also presents at conferences and trains clinicians in the clinical applications of Buddhist psychology. She has been a yogic and Buddhist meditation practitioner for four decades.
2017-08-08 The Skillful Means of Recognizing Empty Appearance 47:20
Lisa Dale Miller gave the third talk in a speaker series titled "Living Wisely in the World: Caring for Mind, Family, Society, and Planet." She explained that though the Buddhist notion of emptiness can be quite challenging for Western Buddhist practitioners, the rich teachings on emptiness offer a clear path to apply wise view, wise action and skillful means in daily life.
2017-02-21 Dharma in Challenging Relationships 43:10
Lisa Dale Miller gave the second talk in a speaker series titled "Everyday Dhamma." She explored how difficult relationships can be rich grounds for practice, because they require us to use skills of wisdom and compassion.
In collection Everyday Dhamma
2015-11-05 Right View 54:50
This is the second talk in a speaker series titled “Eight-Fold Path of Awakening.” The first path factor of the Buddha’s Eightfold Noble Path is right view, also known as wise understanding. Though right view is the first of the Eightfold path factors, it represents the fruition of the succeeding seven path factors. Right view and right intention (the second path factor) together encompass supreme training in wisdom; a training designed to awaken the faculty of penetrative understanding—that which knows things as they truly are. The Buddha defined right view as understanding dukkha—the inherent unsatisfactoriness of all experience—its origin, cessation and the path leading to its cessation. He also defined right view as wisely comprehending Dependent Origination—the Buddha's topology of mind and the cognitive-affective perceptual mechanisms that cause us to misapprehend self and world as separate, autonomous and permanent. The Buddha taught that wrong view is the greatest source of unwholesome mind states and by extension, unwholesome decisions and behaviors. The fruition of right view is a heart-mind liberated from avidyā, the delusion of suffering
In collection Eight-Fold Path of Awakening
2015-03-03 Effortless Mindfulness 44:36
Psychotherapist Lisa Dale Miller discussed her textbook about Buddhist psychology, “Effortless Mindfulness: Genuine Mental Health Through Awakened Presence.” Her talk focused on the varying concept of liberation of mind in the three schools of Buddhism (Theravada, Mahayana and Vajrayana). She also discussed, how through the practical application of Buddhist psychology, a psychotherapist or a mental health professional might facilitate liberation of mind in the people who they work with.

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